Applied sciences

Archives of Foundry Engineering

Content

Archives of Foundry Engineering | 2019 | vol. 19 | No 1 |

Abstract

Variation in final casting dimensions is a major challenge in the investment casting industry. Additional correction operations such as die tool reworking as well as coining operations affect foundry productivity significantly. In this paper influence of basic parameters such as wax material, mould material, number of ceramic coats and feed location on the dimensional accuracy of stainless-steel casting has been investigated. Two levels of each factor were chosen for experimental study. Taguchi approach has been used to design the experiment and to identify the optimal condition of each parameter for reduced dimensional deviation. Analysis of variance has been carried out to determine the contribution of each process parameter. The result reports that selected parameters have significant effect on the dimensional variability of investment casting. Mould material is the dominant parameter with the largest contribution followed by number of ceramic coats and wax material whereas feed location is having negligible contribution.

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Abstract

The article presents an integrated analytical and measurement system for evaluation of the properties of cast metals and alloys. The presented platform is an extension of the SLAG - PROP application with new modules, which allow to use information on metallurgical processes in an even more effective way, as well as to evaluate the finished product. In addition, the construction of a measuring station for the analysis of thermal processes taking place in a metal bath allows for precise observation of phenomena together with their appropriate interpretation. The article presents not only the cooling curves of certain copper alloys. The analysis also covered mechanical properties related to hardness, finished products depending on the mold in which the products were cast. In the literature one can find information about the mechanical properties of products in the improved state, usually after plastic or thermal treatment, omitting their properties obtained as a result of a naturally made casting. The article also presents the method of placing information in the database using a convenient graphical tool.

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Abstract

The paper deals with squeeze casting technology. For this research a direct squeeze casting method has been chosen. As an experimental material, the AlSi12 and AlSi7Mg0.3 alloys were used. The influence of process parameters variation (pouring temperature, mold temperature) on mechanical properties and structure will be observed. For the AlSi7Mg0.3 alloy, a pressure of 30 MPa was used and for the AlSi12 alloy 50 MPa. The thicknesses of the individual walls were selected based on the use of preferred numbers and series of preferred numbers (STN ISO 17) with the sequence of 3.15 mm, 4 mm, 5 mm, 6.3 mm and 8 mm. The width of each wall was 22 mm and length 100 mm. The mechanical properties (Rm, A5) for individual casting parameters and their individual areas of different thicknesses were evaluated. For the AlSi7Mg0.3 alloy, the percentage increase of the tensile strength was up to 37% and the elongation by 400% (at the 8 mm thickness of the casting). For the AlSi12 alloy, the strength increased from 8 to 20% and the tensile strength increased from 5 to 85%. The minimum thickness of the wall to influence the casting properties by pressure was set to 5 mm (based on the used casting parameters). Due to the effect of the pressure during crystallization, a considerable refinement and uniformity of the casting structure occured, also a reduction in the size of the eutectic silicate-eliminated needles was observed.

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Abstract

Mechanical properties of aluminum-silicon alloys are defined by condition of alloying components in the structure, i.e. plastic metallic matrix created from solid solution  on the basis of Al, as well as hard and brittle precipitations of silicon. Size and distribution of silicon crystals are the main factors having effect on field of practical applications of such alloys. Registration of crystallization processes of the alloys on stage of their preparation is directly connected with practical implementation of crystallization theory to controlling technological processes, enabling obtainment of suitable structure of the material and determining its usage for specific requirements. An attempt to evaluate correlation between values of characteristic points laying on crystallization curves and recorded with use of developed by the author TVDA method (commonly denominated as ATND method) is presented in the paper together with assessment of hardness of tested alloy. Basing on characteristic points from the TVDA method, hardness of EN AC-AlSi9Mg alloy modified with strontium has been described in the paper in a significant way by the first order polynomial.

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Abstract

The results of the efficiency of the primary reclamation process as well as the influence of the used sand temperature and other process parameters on it are presented in this paper. A separate stand realized on a reduced scale was built, which is an analogous process of the primary reclamation treatment of spent foundry sands. The used sands were introduced to the crushing process in an agglomerated form in the way typically used in industrial devices. The primary reclamation process was realized on a set of four horizontal sieves with decreasing mesh clearances while maintaining their geometrical dimensions applied in the Regmas industrial device. The model system consists of a vibratory drive mounted on the table, allowing us to control the supply frequency of the vibratory motors within a range of 40-60 Hz as well as the computer system for measuring the vibration parameters and drive power. The used sand on the quartz matrix with the KALTHARZ U404 resin and 100T3 hardener was used in our investigations. The used sand was prepared under the following conditions: cubic-shaped elements made of the applied furan sand was compacted by vibrations then hardened and subjected to heating under controlled conditions (as a “simulation” of the overheating process taking place in the mold after pouring). Time functions of the crushing and sieving process in dependence of the overheating degree of the reference sand samples (100°, 200°, and 300°C) were investigated at various table vibration frequencies and feed loads of the sieve set. The relative index of the crushing ability was determined.

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Abstract

The article is a case study of the steel milling ring casting of about 6 tonnes net weight. The casting has been cast in the steel foundry the authors have been cooperating with. The aim was to analyse the influence of the shape of the chills and the material which was used to make them on the casting crystallization process. To optimally design the chills the set of the computer simulation has been carried out with 3 chills’ shape versions and 3 material’s versions and the results have been compared with the technology being in use (no chills). The proposed chills were of different thermal conductivity from low to high. Their shapes were obviously dependant on the adjacent casting surface geometry but were the result of the attempt to optimise their effect with the minimum weight, too. The chills working efficiency was analysed jointly with the previously designed top feeders system. The following parameters have been chosen to compare their effectiveness and the crystallization process: time to complete solidification and so-called fed volume describing the casting feeding efficiency. The computer simulations have been carried out with use of MagmaSoft v. 5.2 software. Finally, the optimisation has led to 15% better steel yield thanks to 60% top feeders weight reduction and 40% shorter solidification time. The steel ring cast with use of such technology fulfil all quality criteria.

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Abstract

The research focused on the influence of the solution temperature on the structure of precipitation hardening multi-component hypoeutectic aluminium alloys. The AlSi8Cu3 and AlSi6Cu4 alloys were used in the study and were subjected to a thermal-derivative analysis. The chemical composition and crystallization of phases and eutectics shift the characteristic points and the corresponding temperatures to other values, which affect to, for instance, the solution temperature. The alloys were supersaturated at 475°C (according to the determined temperature (TSol) and 505°C for 1.5 hours. Aging was performed at 180°C for 5 hours. The Rockwell hardness measurement, metallographic analysis of alloys by means of light microscopy as well as chemical and phase analysis using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography were carried out on alloys. The use of computer image analysis enabled the determination of the amount of the current Al2Cu phase in the alloys before and after heat treatment.

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Abstract

The effect of CaSiAl modification (43-49% Ca, 43-48% Si, 2% Al) on the non-metallic inclusions and mechanical properties of cast lowcarbon steel is discussed. Tests were carried out on the cast steel with 0.2% C and micro-additives of V and Nb, used mainly for heavy steel castings (e.g. slag ladles). The modifier in an amount of 1.5 and 3 kg / Mg was introduced to the liquid steel before tapping the metal into a ladle. Test ingots of Y type and a weight of 10 kg were cast and then subjected to a normalizing heat treatment. Using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the non-metallic inclusions present in as-cast samples was carried out. Additionally, tests of mechanical strength and impact strength were performed on cast steel with and without the different content of modifier. It was found that increasing the modifier addition affected impact strength but had no significant effect on tensile strength and yield strength. The material with high impact strength had the smallest area fraction of non-metallic inclusions in the microstructure (0.20%). The introduction of modifiers changed the morphology of non-metallic inclusions from dendritic to regular and nodular shapes.

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Abstract

The paper presents some aspects of a development project related to Industry 4.0 that was executed at Nemak, a leading manufacturer of the aluminium castings for the automotive industry, in its high pressure die casting foundry in Poland. The developed data analytics system aims at predicting the casting quality basing on the production data. The objective is to use these data for optimizing process parameters to raise the products’ quality as well as to improve the productivity. Characterization of the production data including the recorded process parameters and the role of mechanical properties of the castings as the process outputs is presented. The system incorporates advanced data analytics and computation tools based on the analysis of variance (ANOVA) and applying an MS Excel platform. It enables the foundry engineers and operators finding the most efficient process variables to ensure high mechanical properties of the aluminium engine block castings. The main features of the system are explained and illustrated by appropriate graphs. Chances and threats connected with applications of the data-driven modelling in die casting are discussed.

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Abstract

The paper presents a method of producing a grey cast iron casting locally reinforced with a titanium insert printed using SLM method (Selective Laser Melting). This article attempts to examine the impact of the selected geometry of titanium spatial insert on the surface layer formation on grey cast iron. The scope of the research focuses on metallographic examination - observation and analysis of the structure of the reinforced surface layer on a light and scanning microscope and a hardness measurement of the titanium layer area. Based on the obtained results, it was concluded that the reaction between titanium insert and metal (grey cast iron) locally develops numerous carbides precipitation (mainly TiC particles), which increases the hardness of the reinforced surface layer and local strengthening of the material. The ratio between the thickness of the support part (grey cast iron) and the working part (titanium insert) affects the resulting layers connection structure. The properties of the obtained reinforced surface layer depend mainly on the geometry of the insert (primarily on the internal dimensions of the connector) and the volume of the casting affecting the re-melting of the insert. A more concentrated structure of carbides precipitation occurs in castings with a full connector insert.

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Abstract

Casting process takes a major percentage of manufacturing products into consideration. No-bake casting is swiftly developing technology for foundry industries. In the no-bake family, furan no-bake casting process employs resins and acid catalyst to form a furan binder system. However, this process configures castings with augmented strength and quality surface finish. Compressive strength, transverse strength and tensile strength of moulds are also high in this furan binder system. Hence this method is apt for producing accurately dimensioned castings. Our well thought-out deliberations in the subsequent write up entail the numerous effects of variation of resin and acid catalyst on the surface defect i.e. sulfur diffusion on the surface of FNB casting. Furan resin; used in the production of casting is furfuryl alcohol and acid catalyst is sulphonic acid. Sulfur diffusion is tested by Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis and also by the spectrometer with jet stream technology. This paper also comprises economic advantages of optimizing resin because furan resin is expensive and catalyst with reduction of sulfur diffusion defect as it saves machining, labor cost, and energy.

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Abstract

The article presents the role of the ceramic layered moulds used in the investment casting method with new (certified) and recycled material from ceramic moulds (CM) after casting process. The materials that were obtained are mainly aluminosilicates and SiO2. The investigation of changes in the quality of ceramic moulds (including the recycled ceramic material) includes the chemical composition of the ceramics as recovered ceramic material, changes in the particle size of the layered covering material, the gas permeability during the pouring of liquid metal, and the creation of the porosity are presented. Than the thermophysical parameters and dimensional accuracy of the casting manufactured in the new ceramic layered shell moulds were analysed. Additionally the global cost savings and improved ecological conditions in the foundry and its surroundings was estimated.

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Abstract

The Ca50Mg20Zn12Cu18 was assessed with different methods in order to characterize its basic characteristics, and to determine whether the amorphous alloy of such composition would be applicable as an implant material. The XRD analysis was conducted to conclude the structure of the initial material. The Ca50Mg20Zn12Cu18 ingot sample demonstrates crystalline structure containing two main intermetallic phases, however as-cast plates show features of an amorphous material, revealing the characteristic amorphous halo on the x-ray patterns. It was confirmed by the scanning electron microscopy method and fracture images revealing chevron pattern morphology with shell type fracture. Corrosion resistance, was studied using the potentiostatic analysis. The amorphous samples show higher resistance than the crystalline one. Post corrosion surface of the Ca50Mg20Zn12Cu18 alloy exhibits high concentration of magnesium and calcium hydroxides, forming the globular structures in large aggregates of spherical units.

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Abstract

There has been a growing interest in the peritectic due to increasing productivity, quality, and alloy development. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) has traditionally been used to study steel solidification but suffers significant limitations when measuring the solidus and peritectic. This work covers a new thermal analysis system that can characterize the peritectic reaction. Heats of AISI/SAE 1030 and 4130 steel were poured to provide some benchmarking of this new technique. The peritectic was detected and the reaction temperature measured. Measurements agree reasonably well with reference information. A review of the literature and thermodynamic calculations did find some disagreement on the exact temperatures for the peritectic and solidus. Some of this difference appears to be related to the experimental techniques employed. It was determined that the system developed accurately indicates these reaction temperatures. The system provides a unique method for examining steel solidification that can be employed on the melt deck.

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Abstract

The most important feature of bells is their sound. Their clarity and beauty depend, first of all, on the bell’s geometry - particularly the shape of its profile and the mechanical properties of alloy. Bells are the castings that work by emitting sound in as-cast state. Therefore all features that are created during melting, pouring, solidification and cooling processes will influence the bell's sound. The mechanical properties of bronze depend on the quality of alloy and microstructure which is created during solidification and depend on its kinetics. Hence, if the solidification parameters influence the alloy’s properties, how could they influence the frequencies of bell`s tone? Taking into account alterable thickness of bell's wall and differences in microstructure, the alloy's properties in bell could be important. In the article authors present the investigations conducted to determine the influence of cooling kinetics on microstructure of bronze with 20 weight % tin contents.

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Abstract

In 2014 we finished research works involved in the development of a technology for manufacturing innovative ceramic-carbon foam filters for molten metal alloys filtration, which were financed by the National Centre for Research and Development (NCBiR) from INNOTECH programme resources. A batch of the filters produced in this technology was tested in practice in domestic cast steel and cast iron foundries. The trials were successful and foundries declared their intention to purchase the newly-developed filters for the current production of casts. This provided an incentive for “Ferro-Term” Sp. z o.o. to start design works on the prototype line for a serial production of these filters. At the same time, in co-operation with a scientific consortium, including the co-authors of the technology, i.e. the Institute of Ceramics and Building Materials, Refractory Materials Division in Gliwice, Institute for the Chemical Processing of Coal in Zabrze and Foundry Research Institute in Cracow, the company made a successful attempt to raise some funds for the necessary adaptation of the developed technology from the semi-technical to industrial scale from Intelligent Development Operational Programme. In the article we have presented information on the effects of works performed within the framework of the project entitled “Modernization and adaptation of the existing technological line for purposes related to technology verification and start-up of the production of innovative ceramic-carbon filters for molten metal alloy filtration”.

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Abstract

The profile of the Polish foundry engineer in the Industry 4.0 age is presented in the present paper. The presented results were obtained by means of three research methods consisting of: analyses of professional expertise documents, questionnaires filled-up by the executive staff of foundry enterprises and analyses of work offers for the foundry engineer position. The investigations indicated the key competences of the foundry engineer, demanded currently by employers and meeting the requirements of the Polish foundry sector. The obtained results were discussed in relation to the fourth industrial revolution and its requirements with regard to the engineering staff. This concept is based on information technology and robotizing, which means the total automation of industrial production processes as well as the widespread access to data and machines. Such an approach requires changes in applied machines, technologies and employees’ competencies. The competences of employees constitute the element deciding on the company success, aimed at obtaining a competitive advantage. Therefore adjusting the employees’ competencies to continuously changing reality is so essential.

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Abstract

This paper deals with the complete technology of inorganic geopolymer binder system GEOPOL® which is a result of long term research and development. The objective of this paper is to provide a theoretical and practical overview of the GEOPOL® binder system and introduce possible ways of moulds and cores production in foundries. GEOPOL® is a unique inorganic binder system, which is needed and welcomed in terms of the environment, the work environment, and the sustainable resources. The GEOPOL® technology is currently used in the foundries for three basic production processes/technologies: (1) for self-hardening moulding mixtures, (2) sand mixtures hardened by gaseous carbon dioxide and (3) the hot box technology with hot air hardening. The GEOPOL® technology not only solves the binder system and the ways of hardening, but also deals with the entire foundry production process. Low emissions produced during mixing of sand, moulding, handling, and pouring bring a relatively significant improvement of work conditions in foundries (no VOCs). A high percentage of the reclaim sand can be used again for the preparation of the moulding mixture.

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Abstract

The conducted work shows and confirms how thermal analysis of grey and ductile iron is an important source for calculating metallurgical data to be used as input to increase the precision in simulation of cooling and solidification of cast iron. The aim with the methodology is to achieve a higher quality in the prediction of macro– and micro porosity in castings. As comparison objects standard type of sampling cups for thermal analysis (solidification module M ≈ 0.6 cm) is used. The results from thermal analysis elaborated with the ATAS MetStar system are evaluated parallel with the material quality (including tendency to external and internal defects) of the tested specimen. Significant temperatures and calculated quality parameters are evaluated in the ATAS MetStar system and used as input to calibrate the density curve as temperature function in NovaFlow&Solid simulation system. The modified data are imported to the NovaFlow&Solid simulation system and compared with real results.

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Abstract

The influence of the chill on the AlSi7Mg alloy properties after the heat treatment T6, was realised in the system of the horizontally cast plate of dimensions 160x240 mm and thickness of 10 and 15 m. The cooling course in individual casting zones was recorded, which allowed to determine the solidification rate. Castings were subjected to the heat treatment T6 process. Several properties of the alloy such as: hardness BHN, density, tensile strength UTS, elongation %E were determined. The microstructure images were presented and the structural SDAS parameter determined. The performed investigations as well as the analysis of the results allowed to determine the influence zone of the chill. The research shows that there is a certain dependence between the thickness of the casting wall and the influence zone of the chill, being not less than 2g, where g is the casting wall thickness. The next aim of successive investigations will be finding the confirmation that there is the dependence between the casting wall thickness and the influence zone of the chill for other thicknesses of walls. We would like to prove that this principle is of a universal character.

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Editorial office

CHIEF EDITORS
Editor
J. Szajnar
Deputy Editor
J. Jezierski

SUBJECT EDITORS
Theoretical Aspects of Casting Processes
K. Eigenfeld – Freiberg, Germany
E. Guzik – Kraków, Poland
T. G. Mathia - Lyon, France
W. Wołczyński – Kraków, Poland
Innovative Foundry Technologies and Materials
T. Elbel – Ostrava, Czech Republic
Z. Ignaszak – Poznań, Poland
O. P. Pandey – Punjab, India
A. Pereira - Vigo, Spain
Foundry Processes Computer Aiding
B. Mochnacki – Częstochowa, Poland
J. Roučka – Brno, Czech Republic
J.S. Suchy – Kraków, Poland
Mechanization, Automation and Robotics in Foundry
J. Bast – Freiberg, Germany
R. Wrona – Kraków, Poland
Transport Systems in Foundry
J. Dańko – Kraków, Poland
Z. Li – Shijiazhuang, China
Castings Quality Management
D. Bolibruchova– Żilina, Slovak Republic
J. D. B. de Mello - Santa Monica, Brazil
M. Perzyk – Warszawa, Poland
Environment Protection
M. Holtzer – Kraków, Poland
H. Polzin – Freiberg, Germany
J. Sobczak – Kraków, Poland
I. Volchok – Zaporizhzhya, Ukraine

EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD
J. Braszczyński – Częstochowa, Poland
B. K. Dhindaw – Rupnagar, India
L. A. Dobrzański – Gliwice, Poland
W. A. Hufenbach – Dresden, Germany
P. Jelínek – Ostrava, Czech Republic
L. Jeziorski – Częstochowa, Poland
J. Lacaze – Toulouse, France
V. L. Naydek – Kiev, Ukraine
A. Passerone – Genova, Italy
I. Riposan – Bucharest, Romania
F. Romankiewicz – Zielona Góra, Poland
A. Sládek – Żilina, Slovak Republic

INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC REVIEW COMMITTEE
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M. Azadi – Tehran, Iran
Y. Babaskin – Kiev, Ukraine
K. Bako – Miskolc, Hungary
E. Bayraktar – Paris, France
L. Bechný – Zilina, Slovak Republic
V. Bednarova - Ostrava, Czech Republic
F. Bińczyk – Katowice, Poland
A. Bokota – Częstochowa, Poland
G.P. Borisov – Kiev, Ukraine
A. Bydałek – Kraków, Poland
C. H. Cáceres – Brisbane, Australia
J. Čech – Brno, Czech Republic
L. Q. Chen – Shenyang, China
A. Chojecki – Kraków, Poland
M. Cholewa – Gliwice, Poland
I. A. Dibrov – Moscow, Russia
D. Dispinar – Istanbul, Turkey
S. M. Dobosz – Kraków, Poland
V. I. Dubodelov – Kiev, Ukraine
A. Fedoryszyn – Krakow, Poland
J. Głownia – Kraków, Poland
K. Granat – Wrocław, Poland
J. Hampl – Ostrava, Czech Republic
J. Helber – Düsseldorf, Germany
M. Hetmańczyk – Katowice, Poland
M. Horáček – Brno, Czech Republic
M. Kaczorowski – Warszawa, Poland
W. Kapturkiewicz – Kraków, Poland
R. Kawalla – Freiberg, Germany
Z. Konopka – Czestochowa, Poland
D. Kopyciński – Kraków, Poland
W. K. Krajewski – Kraków, Poland
Z. Libo – Beijing, China
P. Lichy – Ostrava, Czech Republic
Y. P. Lim – Setapak, Malaysia
T. Lipiński – Olsztyn, Poland
E. Majchrzak – Gliwice, Poland
A. Mityayev - Zaporizhzhya, Ukraine
M. Murgaš – Trnava, Slovak Republic
I. Nová – Liberec, Czech Republic
W. Orłowicz – Rzeszów, Poland
T. Pacyniak – Łódź, Poland
B. Piekarski – Szczecin, Poland
A. Rimmer – West Bromwich, United Kingdom
S. Samavedam – Hyderabad, India
P. Schumacher – Leoben, Austria
N. Sczygiol – Częstochowa, Poland
P. Skočovský – Żilina, Slovak Republic
M.S. Soiński – Częstochowa, Poland
J. Sokolowski – Ottawa, Kanada
K. V. Sudhakar – Butte, USA
B. G. Thomas - Champaign, USA
M. Trbižan – Ljubljana, Slovenia
J. Vuorinen – Tampere, Finland
E. Ziółkowski – Kraków, Poland
J. Zych – Kraków, Poland

ASSOCIATE EDITORS
D. Bartocha – Gliwice, Poland, - editorial secretary
J. Suchoń – Gliwice, Poland - editorial secretary
J. Szymszal – Katowice, Poland, Statistic Editor
A. Dulska – Gliwice, Poland
M. Kondracki – Gliwice, Poland
C. Borek –Chicago, USA, Language Editor

 

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