Applied sciences

Chemical and Process Engineering

Content

Chemical and Process Engineering | 2013 | No 1 March |

Abstract

The paper deals with a study of the effect of regulating elements on local values of heat transfer coefficients along shaped heat exchange surfaces with forced air convection. The use of combined methods of heat transfer intensification, i.e. a combination of regulating elements with appropriately shaped heat exchange areas seems to be highly effective. The study focused on the analysis of local values of heat transfer coefficients in indicated cuts, in distances expressed as a ratio x/s for 0; 0.33; 0.66 and 1. As can be seen from our findings, in given conditions the regulating elements can increase the values of local heat transfer coefficients along shaped heat exchange surfaces. An optical method of holographic interferometry was used for the experimental research into temperature fields in the vicinity of heat exchange surfaces. The obtained values correspond very well with those of local heat transfer coefficients αx, recorded in a CFD simulation.

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Abstract

Reactive distillation (RD) has already demonstrated its potential to significantly increase reactant conversion and the purity of the target product. Our work focuses on the application of RD to reaction systems that feature more than one main reaction. In such multiple-reaction systems, the application of RD would enhance not only the reactant conversion but also the selectivity of the target product. The potential of RD to improve the product selectivity of multiple-reaction systems has not yet been fully exploited because of a shortage of available comprehensive experimental and theoretical studies. In the present article, we want to theoretically identify the full potential of RD technology in multiple-reaction systems by performing a detailed optimisation study. An evolutionary algorithm was applied and the obtained results were compared with those of a conventional stirred tank reactor to quantify the potential of RD to improve the target product selectivity of multiple-reaction systems. The consecutive transesterification of dimethyl carbonate with ethanol to form ethyl methyl carbonate and diethyl carbonate was used as a case study.

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Abstract

This paper presents a numerical analysis of an agitated fully baffled cylindrical vessel with a down pumping four blade worn or unworn pitched blade impeller (α = 45° and 30°) under a turbulent flow regime. CFD simulations predict the pumping capacity of the system equipped by worn and unworn pitched blade impeller. Experimental data were taken from the authors’ previous work and compared with results of numerical computations. A good agreement with experimental data was obtained. The ensemble-average mean velocity field with worn and unworn impellers was computed. It follows from the simulation results that the wear rate of the impeller blade has a significantly negative effect on the velocity distribution in an agitated liquid. The greater the destruction of the worn blade, the higher is the deformation of the velocity field around the rotating impeller, with a simultaneous decrease in impeller pumping capacity.

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Abstract

This article presents a quality analysis of convectively dried fruits and vegetables with preliminary osmotic dehydration. Tests were carried out on banana fruit and red beetroot samples. Hypertonic solutions of fructose for the banana and those of sucrose for the red beetroot were used, each one at three different concentrations. After osmotic dewatering treatment conducted at different time intervals and after osmotic dehydration the samples were dried convectively until an equilibrium with the surroundings was attained. Osmotic dehydration and convective drying curves were determined. The values of Solids Gain (SG), Water Loss (WL) and Weight Reduction (WR) were measured and changes in the samples’ colour and shape after convective drying with and without osmotic pretreatment were assessed.

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Abstract

Balance, thermodynamic and mainly kinetic approaches using methods of process engineering enable to determine conditions under which iron technology can actually work in limiting technological states, at the lowest reachable fuel consumption (reducing factor) and the highest reachable productivity accordingly. Kinetic simulation can be also used for variant prognostic calculations. The paper deals with thermodynamics and kinetics of iron making process. It presents a kinetic model of iron oxide reduction in a low temperature area. In the experimental part it deals with testing of iron ore feedstock properties. The theoretical and practical limits determined by heat conditions, feedstock reducibility and kinetics of processes are calculated.

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Abstract

This paper describes experiments on the application of sodium bicarbonate desulphurisation in the coal-fuel boiler. The boiler has been in operation for several years now and it has refiably fulfilled the original assignment to reduce SO2 emissions from the value of 1200 - 1500 mg/Nm3 to 400 mg/Nm3. Higher desulphurisation efficiency is determined only by the ratio of Na/S sorbent dosage. The resulting product of desulphurisation is stored together with fly ash in underground mines, and has no influence on the groundwater. Positive experience of the tests and boiler operation lies in higher reactivity of sodium and sulphur as compared with conventional methods based on limestone. Within the scope of the secondary measures of elimination of sulphur oxides in combustion products, an experimental dry-method desulphurisation of combustion products was performed by blasting an agent containing sodium bicarbonate NaHCO3 (99.6 %) into the flue ways before the electrostatic precipitator in a coal-fuel furnace with the steam output of 220 t/h.

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Abstract

A particle-level simulation technique has been developed for modelling fibre suspension flow in a converging channel of a papermachine headbox. The fibre model is represented by a chain of elements connected together. The model was verified by the simulation of rigid fibre dynamics in a simple shear flow. The period of rotation was found to be in a very good agreement with theory and reference data. The model was then employed to simulate fibre motion in a converging channel of a papermachine headbox. Fibre suspension motion was resolved using two-step procedure. Velocity field was calculated by means of a commercial CFD code ANSYS Fluent with RSM turbulence model applied and used as an input to the in-house code allowing to simulate fibre dynamics. Results of the calculations were used to construct the fibre orientation probability distribution (FOPD) which was found to be consistent with available experimental data.

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Abstract

The paper deals with the impact of co-firing biomass with coal in boilers on the dew point of the flue gas. Co-firing of biomass may have twofold implications on corrosion and fouling, which are the processes that determine the lowest acceptable flue gas outlet temperature and as a result, boiler efficiency. Both phenomena may be reduced by co-firing of usually low sulphur biomasses or enhanced due to increased moisture content of biomass leading to increased water dew point. The present study concerns the problem of low-temperature corrosion in utility boilers. The paper gives (in the form of diagrams and equations) a relationship between water dew point and moisture content of fuel mixture when co-firing coal and various biomasses. The regression analysis shows that despite significant differences in the characteristics of coals and these of additional fuels, which are planned for co-firing in large-scale power boilers, the water dew point can be described by a function given with the accuracy, which shall be satisfactory for engineering purposes. The discussion of the properties of biofuels indicates that the acid dew point surplus over the water dew point (Δtr = tr - twr) is not likely to exceed 10 K when co-firing biomass. The concluding remarks give recommendations for the appropriate operation of boilers in order to reduce risks associated with biomass co-combustion.

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Abstract

A simple model of behaviour of a single particle on the bulging membrane was presented. As a result of numerical solution of a motion equation the influence of the amplitude and frequency of bulging as well as the particle size on particle behaviour, especially its downstream velocity was investigated. It was found that the bulging of a membrane may increase the mean velocity of a particle or reinforce its diffusive behaviour, dependeing on the permeation velocity. The obtained results may help to design new production methods of highly fouling-resistant membranes.

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Abstract

The demand for a net reduction of carbon dioxide and restrictions on energy efficiency make thermal conversion of biomass a very attractive alternative for energy production. However, sulphur dioxide emissions are of major environmental concern and may lead to an increased corrosion rate of boilers in the absence of sulfatation reactions. Therefore, the objective of the present study is to evaluate the kinetics of formation of sulphur dioxide during switchgrass combustion. Experimental data that records the combustion process and the emission formation versus time, carried out by the National Renewable Energy Institute in Colorado (US), was used to evaluate the kinetic data.

The combustion of switchgrass is described sufficiently accurate by the Discrete Particle Method (DPM). It predicts all major processes such as heating-up, pyrolysis, combustion of switchgrass by solving the differential conservation equations for mass and energy. The formation reactions of sulphur dioxide are approximated by an Arrhenius-like expression including a pre-exponential factor and an activation energy. Thus, the results predicted by the Discrete Particle Method were compared to measurements and the kinetic parameters were subsequently corrected by the least square method until the deviation between measurements and predictions was minimised. The determined kinetic data yielded good agreement between experimental data and predictions.

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Abstract

This paper deals with the effect of impeller shape on off-bottom particle suspension. On the basis of numerous suspension measurements, correlations are proposed for calculating the just-suspended impeller speed for a standard pitched four-blade turbine and three types of hydrofoil impellers produced by TECHMIX for several particle sizes and for a wide range of particle concentrations. The suspension efficiency of the tested impellers is compared with the efficiency of a standard pitched blade turbine on the basis of the power consumption required for off-bottom suspension of solid particles. It is shown that the standard pitched blade turbine needs highest power consumption, i.e. it exhibits less efficiency for particle suspension than hydrofoil impellers produced by TECHMIX.

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Abstract

In the present work, amine based extractant and its mixture with cationic and solvating extractants were tested for the extraction of HCl from chloride solution containing Al(III). The chloride feed solution resulted from the leaching of spent HDS (hydro-desulfurization) catalysts. For this purpose, amine extractants, such as TOA (trioctyl amine), Alamine 336 (a mixture of tri-octyl/decyl amine), Alamine 308 (tri-isooctyl amine), and TEHA (tri 2-ethylhexyl amine) were used and the extraction and stripping behavior of HCl was compared. The extracted HCl was easily stripped from loaded TEHA phase, when compared with the other tested tertiary amine system. Solvent extraction reaction of HCl by TEHA was determined from the extraction data. Unlike TOA and Alamine 336, adding cationic extractant to TEHA had negligible effect on the extraction and stripping of HCl. In our experimental ranges, no Al was extracted by amines and pure HCl was recovered. MaCabe- Thiele diagrams for the extraction and stripping of HCl by TEHA were constructed.

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Abstract

The most important and the most frequently used plastics are polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP). They are characterised with high heating values (approximately 40 MJ/kg). Moreover, their chemical composition, based mainly on carbon and hydrogen, allows to use them in industrial processes. One of the methods of utilisation of plastic waste can be its use in the metallurgical industry. This paper presents results of thermal decomposition of waste PE/PP. Chemical and thermal analysis (TG) of studied wastes was carried out. Evolved gaseous products from the decomposition of wastes were indentified using mass spectrometry (TG-MS). This paper also presents an application of plastic wastes as supplemental fuel in blast furnace processes (as a substitute for coke) and as an addition in processes of coking coal.

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Abstract

Saccharamyces cerevisia known as baker’s yeast is a product used in various food industries. Worldwide economic competition makes it a necessity that industrial processes be operated in optimum conditions, thus maximisation of biomass in production of saccharamyces cerevisia in fedbatch reactors has gained importance. The facts that the dynamic fermentation model must be considered as a constraint in the optimisation problem, and dynamics involved are complicated, make optimisation of fed-batch processes more difficult. In this work, the amount of biomass in the production of baker’s yeast in fed-batch fermenters was intended to be maximised while minimising unwanted alcohol formation, by regulating substrate and air feed rates. This multiobjective problem has been tackled earlier only from the point of view of finding optimum substrate rate, but no account of air feed rate profiles has been provided. Control vector parameterisation approach was applied the original dynamic optimisation problem which was converted into a NLP problem. Then SQP was used for solving the dynamic optimisation problem. The results demonstrate that optimum substrate and air feeding profiles can be obtained by the proposed optimisation algorithm to achieve the two conflicting goals of maximising biomass and minimising alcohol formation.

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Editorial office

Editor-in-Chief
Andrzej K. Biń, Warsaw University of Technology, Poland

Editorial Board
Andrzej Burghardt (Chairman), Polish Academy of Sciences, Gliwice, Poland
Jerzy Bałdyga, Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Andrzej Górak, T.U. Dortmund, Germany
Leon Gradoń, Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Andrzej Jarzębski, Silesian University of Technology, Poland
Zdzisław Jaworski, West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin, Poland
Władysław Kamiński, Technical University of Łódź, Poland
Stefan Kowalski, Poznań University of Technology, Poland
Andrzej Krasławski, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland
Stanisław Ledakowicz, Technical University of Łódź, Poland
Eugeniusz Molga, Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Alvin W. Nienow, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom
Andrzej Noworyta, Wrocław University of Technology, Poland
Ryszard Pohorecki, Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Andrzej Stankiewicz, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
Czesław Strumiłło, Technical University of Łódź, Poland
Stanisław Sieniutycz, Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Krzysztof Warmuziński, Polish Academy of Sciences, Gliwice, Poland
Laurence R. Weatherley, University of Kansas, Lawrence, United States
Günter Wozny, T.U. Berlin, Germany
Ireneusz Zbiciński, Technical University of Łódź, Poland

Technical Editor
Barbara Zakrzewska, West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin, Poland
Language Editor
Marek Stelmaszczyk, West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin, Poland

 

Contact

Editorial Office
ul. Waryńskiego 1
00-645 Warszawa
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email: andrzej.bin@outlook.com

 

Instructions for authors

All manuscripts submitted for publication in Chemical and Process Engineering must comprise a description of original research that has neither been published nor submitted for publication elsewhere.

The content, aim and scope of the proposals should comply with the main subject of the journal, i.e. they should deal with mathematical modelling and/or experimental investigations on momentum, heat and mass transfer, unit processes and operations, integrated processes, biochemical engineering, statics and kinetics of chemical reactions. The experiments and modelling may cover different scales and processes ranging from the molecular phenomena up to production systems. The journal language is grammatically correct British English.

Chemical and Process Engineering publishes: i) full text research articles, ii) invited reviews, iii) letters to the editor and iv) short communications, aiming at important new results and/or applications. Each of the publication form is peer-reviewed by at least two independent referees.  

Submission of materials for publication

The manuscripts are submitted for publication via Internet site www.chpe.pl and its subfolder Authors Pathway or e-mail address andrzej.bin@outlook.com. When writing the manuscript, authors should preferably use the template for articles, which is available on the www.chpe.pl page in section Instructions for Authors.   

Proposals of a paper should be uploaded using the Internet site of the journal and should contain:

  • a manuscript file in Word format (*.doc, *.docx),
  • the manuscript mirror in PDF format,
  • all graphical figuresin separate graphics files.

In the following paragraphthe general guidelines for the manuscript preparation are presented.

Manuscript outline

        1. Header details
          1. Title of paper
          2. Names (first name and further initials) and surnames of authors
          3. Institution(s) (affiliation)
          4. Address(es) of authors
          5. Information about the corresponding author; academic title, name and surname, email address, address for correspondence
        2. Abstract – should contain a short summary of the proposed paper. In the maximum of 200 words the authors should present the main assumptions, results and conclusions drawn from the presented study.
        3. Keywords– Up to 5 characteristic keyword items should be provided.
        4. Text
          1. Introduction. In this part, description of motivation for the study and formulation of the scientific problem should be included and supported by a concise review of recent literature.
          2. Main text. It should contain all important elements of the scientific investigations, such as presentation of experimental rigs, mathematical models, results and their discussion. This part may be divided into subchapters.
          3. Conclusions. The major conclusions can be put forward in concise style in a separate chapter. Presentation of conclusions from the reported research work accompanied by a short commentary is also acceptable.
          4. Figures: drawings, diagrams and photographs can be in colour and should be located in appropriate places in the manuscript text according to the template provided on the www.chpe.pl page. Their graphical form should be of vector or raster type with the minimum resolution of 900 dpi. In addition, separate files containing each of the drawings, graphs and photos should be uploaded onto the journal Web site in one of the following formats: bmp, gif, tiff, jpg, eps. Due to rigid editorial reasons, graphical elements created within MS Word and Excel are not acceptable. The final length of figures should be intended typically for 8 cm (single column) or 16 cm in special cases of rich-detail figures. The basic font size of letters in figures should be at least 10 pts after adjusting graphs to the final length.  

          Figures: drawings, diagrams and photographs should be in gray scale. In case of coloured graphs or photo an additional payment of 300 PLN (72 €) per 1 page containing coloured figures on both sides, or 150 PLN (36 €) per page containing coloured figures on one side will be required.

          Tables should be made according to the format shown in the template.

        5. All figures and tables should be numbered and provided with appropriate title and legend, if necessary. They have to be properly referenced to and commented in the text of the manuscript.

        6. List of symbols should be accompanied by their units
        7. Acknowledgements may be included before the list of literature references
        8. Literature citations

 

The method of quoting literature source in the manuscript depends on the number of its authors:

  • single author – their surname and year of publication should be given, e.g. Marquardt (1996) or (Marquardt, 1996),
  • two authors – the two surnames separated by the conjunction “and” with the publication year should be given, e.g. Charpentier and McKenna (2004) or (Charpentier and McKenna, 2004),
  • three and more authors – the surname of the first author followed by the abbreviation “et al.” and year of publication should be given, e.g. Bird et al. (1960) or (Bird et al., 1960).

In the case of citing more sources in one bracket, they should be listed in alphabetical order using semicolon for separation, e.g. (Bird et al., 1960; Charpentier and McKenna, 2004; Marquardt, 1996). Should more citations of the same author(s) and year appear in the manuscript then letters “a, b, c, ...” should be successively applied after the publication year.

Bibliographic data of the quoted literature should be arranged at the end of the manuscript text in alphabetic order of surnames of the first author. It is obligatory to indicate the DOI number of those literature items, which have the numbers already assigned. Journal titles should be specified by typingtheir right abbreviationsor, in case of doubts, according to the List of Title Word Abbreviations available at http://www.issn.org/2-22661-LTWA-online.php.

Examples of citation for:

Articles
Charpentier J. C., McKenna T. F., 2004.Managing complex systems: some trends for the future of chemical and process engineering. Chem. Eng. Sci., 59, 1617-1640. DOI: 10.1016/j.ces.2004.01.044.

Information from books (we suggest adding the page numbers where the quoted information can be found)
Bird R. B., Stewart W.E., Lightfood E.N., 2002. Transport Phenomena. 2nd edition, Wiley, New York, 415-421.

Chapters in books
Hanjalić K., Jakirlić S., 2002. Second-moment turbulence closure modelling, In: Launder B.E., Sandham N.D. (Eds.), Closure strategies for turbulent and transitional flows. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 47-101.

Conferences
ten Cate A., Bermingham S.K., Derksen J.J., Kramer H.M.J., 2000. Compartmental modeling of an 1100L DTB crystallizer based on Large Eddy flow simulation. 10th European Conference on Mixing. Delft, the Netherlands, 2-5 July 2000, 255-264.

8. Payments

Starting from 2014 a principle of publishing articles against payment is introduced, assuming non-profit making editorial office. According to the principle authors or institutions employing them, will have to cover the expenses amounting to 40 PLN (or 10 €) per printed page. The above amount will be used to supplement the limited financial means received from the Polish Academy of Sciences for the editorial and publishing; and in particular to increase the capacity of the next CPE volumes and to proofread the linguistic correctness of the articles. The method of payment will be indicated in an invoice sent to the authors or institutions after acceptance of their manuscripts to be published. In justifiable cases presented in writing, the editorial staff may decide to relieve authors from basic payment, either partially or fully. All correspondence should be sent to Editor-in-Chief, Prof. Andrzej K. Biń, email address: andrzej.bin@outlook.com.


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