Search results

Filters

  • Journals
  • Authors
  • Keywords
  • Date
  • Type

Search results

Number of results: 4
items per page: 25 50 75
Sort by:

Abstract

Epifaunal organisms (bryozoans, foraminifera, serpulid polychaetes, cirripeds, octocorals), scratch marks and borings (brachiopod pedicle attachment traces and gastropod, phoronid, sponge and algal boreholes) were recognized on the brachiopod shells from the Eocene La Meseta Formation of Seymour Island, Antarctic Peninsula. They are rare and occur only on about 10% of shells. It is probable that environmental conditions were not suitable for epibionts whose requirements were to be higher than those of brachiopods. The rarity of epifauna on the dead shells can be explained by their rapid burial.
Go to article

Abstract

The species of the brachiopod genus Terebratella d'Orbigny, which does not correspond to any one reported hitherto from the upper Eocene-? lower Oligocene La Meseta Formation of Seymour Island, West Antarctica but showing a strong affinity to the Recent T. inconspicua (Sowerby), is described.
Go to article

Abstract

Brachiopods from the Chlamys Ledge Member, uppermost part of the Polonez Cove Formation (Oligocene), of King George Island, West Antarctica are represented by the undeterminable Rhynchonellida, one short-looped terebratulide Liothyrella Thomson, and two long-looped terebratellidines: Rhizothyris Thomson and Terebratelloidea gen. et sp. indet. Liothyrella is a well known genus in the Cenozoic strata and Recent waters of the Southern Hemisphere, while Rhizothyris is noted for the second time in the Antarctic region. This is the first record of brachiopods from the Chlamys Ledge Member.
Go to article

Abstract

Brachiopods are reported for the first time from the Lower Miocene Cape Melville Formation of King George Island, South Shetland Islands, West Antarctica. Two genera, Liothyrella Thomson and Paraldingia Richardson have been identified. This is the first occurrence of Paraldingia in Antarctica.
Go to article

This page uses 'cookies'. Learn more