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Number of results: 12
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Abstract

Thin plates, in the form of individual panels or whole device casings, often separate the noise source from its recipients. It would be very desirable if the panels could effectively block the sound transmission preventing noise from further propagation. This is especially challenging to achieve at low frequencies. A promising approach, intensively developed in the recent years, is to employ active control methods by adding sensors and actuators, and running a control algorithm. However, if the noise is narrow-band, an alternative passive solution originally developed by the authors can be applied. It is based on appropriately located passive elements which can be used to alter the frequency response of the vibrating structure thus improving its sound insulation properties. Such an approach is referred to as the frequency response shaping method. The purpose of this paper is to further develop this method and apply it to a device casing panel. The efficiency of the method is evaluated by simulation and real experiments. Appropriate cost functions and mathematical models are formulated and used to optimise the arrangement of passive elements mounted to the plate, enhancing its sound insulation properties at the given frequency range. The results are reported, and advantages and limits of the method are pointed out and discussed.
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Abstract

Passive noise reduction methods require thick and heavy barriers to be effective for low frequencies and those clasical ones are thus not suitable for reduction of low frequency noise generated by devices. Active noise-cancelling casings, where casing walls vibrations are actively controlled, are an interesting alternative that can provide much higher low-frequency noise reduction. Such systems, compared to classical ANC systems, can provide not only local, but also global noise reduction, which is highly expected for most applications. For effective control of casing vibrations a large number of actuators is required. Additionally, a high number of error sensors, usually microphones that measure noise emission from the device, is also required. All actuators have an effect on all error sensors, and the control system must take into account all paths, from each actuator to each error sensor. The Multiple Error FXLMS has very high computational requirements. To reduce it a Switched-Error FXLMS, where only one error signal is used at the given time, have been proposed. This, however, significantly reduces convergence rate. In this paper an algorithm that uses multiple errors at once, but not all, is proposed. The performance of various algorithm variants is compared using simulations with the models obtained from real active-noise cancelling casing.
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Abstract

Authors paid attention to anatomy and clinical implications which are associated with the variations of the sphenoid sinus. We discuss also anatomical structure of the sphenoid bone implementing clinical application of this bone to diff erent invasive and miniinvasive procedures (i.e. FESS).
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