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Abstract

Elzenbergowska teza o obiektywnej tożsamości dobra i piękna nie jest przekonywająca. Problem można zanalizować na gruncie Wittgensteinowskiej ontologii sytuacji, co daje lepsze widoki na jego rozwiązanie. Zbiory stanów rzeczy dobrych (D) i pięknych (P) ani się nie pokrywają, ani nie przecinają, ani D nie zawiera się w P. Nie da się wskazać dla D i P cechy rodzajowej i różnicy gatunkowej. P i D dają się jedynie definiować cząstkowo – przez przykłady i zbliżanie się do ich zbiorów wyczerpujących. W języku naturalnym wyróżnia się wiele odmian dobra i piękna, rozmaicie powiązanych, na przykład „piękno moralne”, „moralną brzydotę”, ale też „brzydotę amoralną”, a nawet „szpetne dobro”. Jednakże zbiory P i D (oraz B i Z – stanów rzeczy szpetnych i złych) są rozłączne. Otóż w konkretnej sytuacji pięknej może tkwić abstrakcyjny stan rzeczy odnoszący się do dobra, a w konkretnej sytuacji dobrej – abstrakcyjny stan rzeczy odnoszący się do piękna. Te abstrakcyjne „rdzenie” sytuacji mogą piękno intersubiektywnie „zabarwiać” dobrem, a dobro pięknem.
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Abstract

The works of Bogusław Wolniewicz contain a philosophical system. It needs to be extracted and revealed through a recomposition of his output which comprises close to 600 individual publications and auditions. It is a system of Pythagorean-Manichean kind, or, to put it differently, Leibnizian-Augustinian kind. The Professor described his philosophy as a rational ‘tychism’. It claims that the world and man are governed by chance (especially human nature in which an element of evil has some influence) and that mind, even though it uses logic to reflect the world, is barely an irrelevant addition in the vast universe. Such a stance is unusual in modern thought, though not in the history of thinking. It is in clear opposition to the scientifically bended rationalism and irrationalism that dominate contemporary thought. The logical coherency and extensiveness of Wolniewicz’s concerns constitute the essence of his philosophical system, though it goes largely unnoticed, due to the meaninglessness of several of his claims to his opponents. At its foundation lies the metaphysics of situations developed by L. Wittgenstein but further elaborated by Wolniewicz. The contribution by Wolniewicz is not his greatest accomplishment, however. The metaphysics of situations is his organon – merely a thinking tool – used to extract the most crucial and deeply hidden truths about the world. Due to these circumstances and the modern achievements in logic when it is practiced in Wolniewicz’s style, new discoveries are made that were not possible in the past. For example, it is possible to incorporate both Christian axiology and anthropology with Marx’s sociology in one system. It evocates widespread amazement but also fierce resistance from conservative readers, but their protests are ungrounded. ‘Truth always agrees with truth’ – said Wolniewicz. When it comes to Wolniewicz’s system, its coherence counts most, and it is best manifested in the objectivistic and absolutistic philosophy of values as well as pessimistic philosophy of the human condition (both being of Christian provenance). One can depict Wolniewicz’s system as a cathedral with numerous towers, persistently built over 70 years of his active academic life. The main towers are: ontological-theological, anthropological and axiological (of practical philosophy, describing human duties). Standing shoulder to shoulder with them are smaller turrets corresponding to such subfields as epistemology, philosophy of culture, philosophy of religion, esthetics etc. The metaphysical aspect of Wolniewicz’s philosophy is blended from specific classic theorems and original claims expressed in synthetic a priori propositions. They are supported by the logical structure of language, and language itself is supported by the structure of human genotype (DNA). Technically one can reach the most general truths about the world by continuous thinking, but the ability to use that skill is a privilege reserved for exceptional geniuses.
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