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Number of results: 12
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Abstract

We talk to Dr. Andrzej Kruszewicz, director of Warsaw Zoo, about animals being held in “captivity.”
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Abstract

The amount and composition of lipids m some Antarctic animals were studied. The material consisted of crustaceans (Euphausia superba, Paramoera sp., Orchomene sp.), tunicates (Salpa thompsoni) and vertebrates (Notothenia rossi marmorata and Hydrurga leptonyx). The author's data are discussed on the background of available literature information.
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Abstract

Empathy is one of the traits that make us human. In exploring the origins of empathy disorders, however, we can learn a lot by studying animals.
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Abstract

How can we learn about the diet, health and parasites of animals which have long since gone extinct? One excellent, although perhaps slightly revolting way is to study pieces of fossilized excrement, known as coprolites.
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Abstract

Enterococcus hirae belongs in the Enterococcus faecium group within the genus Enterococcus. This species occurs naturally in the environment, commensally in the alimentary tracts of animals, and pathologically for example in humans with urinary infections. Some strains of E. hirae possess virulence factors, including biofilm formation. Biofilm growth protects bacteria against host de- fences; biofilm can be a source of persistent infection. Testing bacterial strains for their ability to form biofilm might therefore facilitate their treatment or prevention. This study focuses on bio- film formation by E. hirae strains derived from various animals. This kind of testing has never been done before. A total of 64 identified E. hirae from laying hens, ducks, pheasants, ostriches, rabbits, horses and a goat were tested by means of three methods; using Congo red agar, the tube method and microtiter plate agar. The majority of strains were found to form biofilm. 62.5% of strains were biofilm-forming, four categorized as highly positive (OD570 ≥1); most strains were low-grade biofilm positive (0.1 ≤ OD 570 < 1). Related to poultry, 55 E. hirae strains were tested nd found to produce biofilm; 24 strains did not form biofilm, 31 strains were biofilm-forming; 27 strains showed low-grade biofilm formation, and four strains were highly biofilm-forming. Four strains from hens and ostriches reached the highest OD570 values, more than 0.500. Rabbit-derived E. hirae strains as well as strains isolated from horses and the goat were low-grade bio- film-forming. Microtiter plate assay proved to be the best tool for testing the in vitro biofilm for- mation capacity of E. hirae strains from different species of animals.
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Abstract

The pace of climate change observed since the beginning of the industrial era has prompted scientists to seriously consider whether human activity is to blame for global warming. On the geological timescale, however, climate change is certainly nothing new or exceptional – as is clear when one looks at the record of plant and animal fossils.
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Abstract

The aim of this paper is to analyse various animal-specifi c complex lexical units together with patterns that can be held responsible for their underlying conceptual structure. Many examples of the data investigated in the paper seem to represent compounds as they are traditionally understood in the literature of the subject (see, among others, Bauer 2003; Katamba and Stonham 2006; Lieber and Štekauer 2009; Fàbregas and Scalise 2012; Bauer et al. 2013); however, others do not meet the basic criteria for compoundhood as postulated by, for example, Altakhaineh (2016). In my research I use the term animal-specifi c complex lexical units with reference to all animal-related composite expressions being the result of the working of metaphor-metonymy interaction.
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Abstract

The presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in blood induces an inflammatory response which leads to multiple organ dysfunction and numerous metabolic disorders. Uncontrolled, improper or late intervention may lead to tissue hypoxia, anaerobic glycolysis and a disturbance in the acid -base balance. The effects of LPS-induced toxemia on biological and immunological markers were well studied. However, parameters such as base excess, ions, and acid-base balance were not fully investigated. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine these blood parameters collectively in LPS-induced inflammatory toxemia in rat’s model. After induction of toxemia by injecting LPS at a rate of 5 mg/kg body weight intravenously, blood was collected from the tail vein of twenty rats and immediately analyzed. After 24 hours, the animals were sacrificed and the blood was collected from the caudal vena cava. The results revealed that the levels of pH, bicarbonate, partial pressure of oxygen, oxygen saturation, Alveolar oxygen, hemoglobin, hematocrit, magnesium (Mg2+), and calcium (Ca2+) were significantly decreased. On the other side, the levels of Base excess blood, Base excess extracellular fluid, partial pressure of carbon dioxide, lactate, Ca2+/Mg2+, potassium, and chloride were significantly increased compared to those found pre toxemia induction. However, sodium level showed no significant change. In conclusion, Acute LPS-toxemia model disturbs acid-base balance, blood gases, and ions. These parameters can be used to monitor human and animal toxemic inflammatory response induced by bacterial LPS conditions to assist in the management of the diagnosed cases.
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Abstract

The article tackles issues of the pedagogy of place, with a special emphasis on the urban context. On the basis of fundamental theses asserting that a city is a text (Vladimir Toporov) and that places are pedagogical (Maria Mendel) – the author concentrates on symbols. Definition of this concept, as well as de3 nitions of its particular exemplifications, create a theoretical basis for further practical considerations. Presenting methodology of a research project Reading the City (Czytanie miasta) conducted in the years 2015–2016, the author creates new research challenges for pedagogues. Presentation of wide variety of city symbolism, encompassing both cultural manifestations (towers, bridges) and a realm of nature (mountains, river), leads to proposed educational applications. Descriptions of realized animations based on research form a summary of this article.
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Abstract

The aim of the study was to evaluate the visualization of the rabbit common calcanean tendon and adjacent structures in the high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 1.5 T field strength and to compare the results with those previously obtained for the low-field MRI (0.25 T). Eight New Zealand rabbits were used in the post-mortem study and the results indicate that the high-field MRI provides more detailed images only in transverse scans, where the outer outline of the tendon was visualized more accurately. Other analysed structures were imaged with a resolution comparable to the low-field MRI.
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Abstract

Animals kept outside their natural environment often suffer from boredom. They don’t hunt or have a chance to conduct their mating rituals, and their natural tendency for physical activity is limited by space. These deficiencies affect their psychological well-being. But when it comes to dogs, we can help them by exploiting their excellent sense of smell.
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Abstract

The article presents Charles Taylor’s critical philosophy of language and it reviews his recent book on the human linguistic capacity. Critical philosophy of language is understood here as a broad (philosophical, social and political) perspective on language characterized by multifaceted concern with the linguistic and cognitive mechanisms involved in language use. The paper discusses Taylor’s interest in language and philosophy of language, and focuses on his seminal distinction between the ‘designative-instrumental’ and ‘constitutive-expressive’ theories of language. In the former theory language is understood within the confi nes of Cartesian representational epistemology, whereas in the latter language constitutes meaning and shapes human experience (one of the features important for defi ning the critical approach to philosophy of language).
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