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Abstract

This study manufactured a SiC coating layer using the vacuum kinetic spray process and investigated its microstructure and wear properties. SiC powder feedstock with a angular shape and average particle size of 37.4 μm was used to manufacture an SiC coating layer at room temperature in two different process conditions (with different degrees of vacuum). The thickness of the manufactured coating layers were approximately 82.4 μm and 129.4 μm, forming a very thick coating layers. The SiC coating layers consisted of α-SiC and β-SiC phases, which are identical to the feedstock. Cross-sectional observation confirmed that the SiC coating layer formed a dense structure. In order to investigate the wear properties, ball crater tests were performed. The wear test results confirmed that the SiC coating layer with the best wear resistance achieved approximately 4.16 times greater wear resistance compared to the Zr alloy. This study observed the wear surface of the vacuum kinetic sprayed SiC coating layer and identified its wear mechanism. In addition, the potential applications of the SiC coating layer manufactured using the new process were also discussed.
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Abstract

Recently, attempts have been made to use porous metal as catalysts in a reactor for the hydrogen manufacturing process using steam methane reforming (SMR). This study manufactured Ni-Cr-Al based powder porous metal, stacked cubic form porous blocks, and investigated high temperature random stack creep property. To establish an environment similar to the actual situation, a random stack jig with a 1-inch diameter and height of 75 mm was used. The porous metal used for this study had an average pore size of ~1161 μm by rolling direction. The relative density of the powder porous metal was measured as 6.72%. A compression test performed at 1073K identified that the powder porous metal had high temperature (800°C) compressive strength of 0.76 MPa. A 800°C random stack creep test at 0.38 MPa measured a steady-state creep rate of 8.58×10–10 s–1, confirming outstanding high temperature creep properties. Compared to a single cubic powder porous metal with an identical stress ratio, this is a 1,000-times lower (better) steady-state creep rate. Based on the findings above, the reason of difference in creep properties between a single creep test and random stack creep test was discussed.
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