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Abstract

This paper deals with the modelling of traction linear induction motors (LIMs) for public transportation. The magnetic end effect inherent to these motors causes an asymmetry of their phase impedances. Thus, if the LIM is supplied from the three-phase symmetrical voltage, its phase currents become asymmetric. This effect must be taken into consideration when simulating the LIMs’ performance. Otherwise, when the motor phase currents are assumed to be symmetric in the simulation, the simulation results are in error. This paper investigates the LIM performance, considering the end-effect induced asymmetry of the phase currents, and presents a comparative study of the LIM performance characteristics in both the voltage and the current mode.
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Abstract

The single-phase voltage loss is a common fault. Once the voltage-loss failure occurs, the amount of electrical energy will not be measured, but it is to be calculated so as to protect the interest of the power supplier. Two automatic calculation methods, the power substitution and the voltage substitution, are introduced in this paper. Considering the lack of quantitative analysis of the calculation error of the voltage substitution method, the grid traversal method and MATLAB tool are applied to solve the problem. The theoretical analysis indicates that the calculation error is closely related to the voltage unbalance factor and the power factor, and the maximum calculation error is about 6% when the power system operates normally. To verify the theoretical analysis, two three-phase electrical energy metering devices have been developed, and verification tests have been carried out in both the lab and field conditions. The lab testing results are consistent with the theoretical ones, and the field testing results show that the calculation errors are generally below 0.2%, that is correct in most cases.
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