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Number of results: 8
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Abstract

The paper presents an overview of lithostratigraphy and radiochronological and biochronological data for the Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary successions of King George Island, South Shetland Islands (West Antarctica). Special stress was laid on dating fossiliferous terrestrial and marine strata and glacial and glacio-marine deposits of Tertiary age. for which King George Island offers the most complete and so-far best documented standard in the Antarctic Peninsula sector of West Antarctica.
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Abstract

Thin coal seams found in the Lions Cove Formation, Polonia Glacier Group (Middle Eocene, upper part) at King George Bay, King George Island (South Shetland Islands, West Antarctica), represent lustrous (vitrine) brown-coal metaphase. The coal from the lower seam represents carbonized wood, probably angiosperm, that from the upper ones originated due to accumulation of branches or larger wood fragments and leaf remains. These coals are slightly older than metaxylite brown coal previously described from Admiralty Bay on King George Island, and dated at Eocene-Oligocene boundary. Both coal occurrences are evidences for a warm climate which prevailed in the Antarctic Peninsula sector during the Arctowski Interglacial (ca 50—32 Ma).
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Abstract

A new species of genus Panopea Menard de la Groye, named P. (P). andreae sp. n. is described in detail. It is the most common of bivalve species recorded in the Destruction Bay Formation (Early Miocene) of King George Island (South Shetland Islands, West Antarctica). The bivalve material collected includes in addition: P. (P) aff. worthingtoni Hutton, Eurhomalia cf. antarctica (Shermann and Newton) and E. cf. newtoni (Wilcknes).
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Abstract

Planktonie foraminifera of the genera Chiloguembelina Loeblich and Tappan. Globigerina d'Orbigny and Globorolalia Cushman are reported from glacio-marine sediments of the Low Head Member (Polonez Cove Formation, Oligocene) of King George Island (South Shetland Islands). West Antarctica. The foraminifer assemblage comprises two stratigraphically important species: Globigerina angiporoides Hornibrook and Chiloguembelina cubensis (Palmer), which indicate the Upper Eocene — Lower Oligocene age. Taking into account specific composition, this planktonie assemblage may tentatively be correlated with the Globigerina angiporoides Zone of New Zealand. Australia. South Pacific and South Atlantic, which belongs to the Lower Oligocene (see Jenkins 1985).
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Abstract

Rotary kiln installation forms a very complex system, as it consists of various components which affect cement production. However, some problems with particle settling are encountered during operation of tertiary air installation. This paper reports on the results of a study into gas-particle flow in a tertiary air duct installation. This flow was calculated using Euler method for air motion and Lagrange method for particle motion. The results in this paper demonstrate that study focus on the tertiary air installation is a practical measure without the analysis of other processes in the rotary kiln. A solution to this problem offers several alternatives of modifying the inlet to the tertiary air duct. As a result of numerical calculations, we demonstrate the influence of geometry of a rotary kiln modification on the number of large particles transported in the tertiary air duct. The results indicate that in order to reduce large particles, rotary kiln head geometry needs to be modified, and a particle settler should be installed at its outlet.
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Abstract

The Polish geological research on King George Island, South Shetland Islands (West Antarctica), during the two past decades (1977-1996) included: stratigraphy, radiometric dating, petrology and geochemistry, sedimentology and palaeoenvironmental studies, volcanology, tectonics, structural geology, Quaternary geology, paleobotany and palaeozoology. The major scientific achievements were: (1) the establishment of formal lithostratigraphic standards for radiometrically-dated Upper Cretaceous through Tertiary magmatic rock sequences and intercalated sediments; (2) the discovery of four Tertiary glaciations and three interglacials, spanning some 30 Ma from Early/Middle Eocene through Early Miocene; (3) the discovery and systematic elaboration of rich terrestrial and marine biota of Late Cretaceous through Early Miocene ages; (4) the reconstruction of changing Late Cretaceous and Tertiary terrestrial and marine palaeoenvironments in a mobile volcanic-arc setting; (5) the determination of age and structural evolution of the island's two Quaternary volcanoes; (6) the reconstruction of the Late Cretaceous through Recent evolution stages of the South Shetland magmatic arc and its backarc Bransfield Basin and Rift, based on tectonic and structural studies.
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Abstract

Resonance assignment remains one of the hardest stages in RNA tertiary structure determination with the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy. We propose an evolutionary algorithm being a tool for an automatization of the procedure. NOE pathway, which determines the assignments, is constructed during an analysis of possible connections between resonances within aromatic and anomeric region of 2D-NOESY spectra resulting from appropriate NMR experiments. Computational tests demonstrate the performance of the evolutionary algorithm as compared with the exact branch-and-cut procedure applied for the experimental and simulated spectral data for RNA molecules.
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Abstract

This report describes aims and preliminary results of geological fieldwork carried out by a joint Argentine-Polish party on Seymour (Marambio) and Cockburn islands. Antarctic Peninsula, during austral summer of 1987 88. Seymour Island exposes chiefly shallow-marine, fossiliferous siliciclastic sediments that form an upper, 2000 m thick part in the Mesozoic-Tertiary backarc basin-infill of the Antarctic Peninsula. The fieldwork centered on paleontology and sedimentology of the La Meseta Formation (upper Eocene- ?lower Oligocene), although some observations of older deposits were carried out also. Clupeoid fishes were discovered in the La Meseta Formation. This is the first record of such fish fossils on the Antarctic continent.
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