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Number of results: 16
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Abstract

A novel method of active noise control using adaptive radiation sound sources is investigated. A finite element model of a modal enclosed sound field is excited harmonically, representing a noise field in the low-frequency range. The control sources are comprised of elementary dipole sources for which the driving signals are adjusted by an optimization method. Two set-up cases of the proposed compound sources are investigated. The coupling of the control sources with the modal sound field is discussed. The simulated performance of the proposed method is compared with that of a system with distributed simple sources and the results show the effectiveness of the sources with adaptive radiation for active noise control in small enclosures.
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Abstract

We study an elegant snap system with only one nonlinear term, which is a quadratic nonlinearity. The snap systemdisplays chaotic attractors,which are controlled easily by changing a system parameter. By using analysis, simulations and a real circuit, the dynamics of such a snap system has been investigated. We also investigate backstepping based adaptive control schemes for the new snap system with unknown parameters.
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Abstract

This work describes a new study to achieve a combination of modified function projective synchronization between three different chaotic systems through adaptive control. Using the Lyapunov function theory, the asymptotic stability of the error dynamics is obtained and discussed. Further, we set some appropriate initial conditions for the state variables and assigning specific values to the parameters and obtain the graphical results, which shows the efficiencies of the new method. Finally, we summarized our work with conclusion and references.
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Abstract

Noise control has gained a lot of attention recently. However, presence of nonlinearities in signal paths for some applications can cause significant difficulties in the operation of control algorithms. In particular, this problem is common in structural noise control, which uses a piezoelectric shunt circuit. Not only vibrating structures may exhibit nonlinear characteristics, but also piezoelectric actuators. In this paper, active device casing is addressed. The objective is to minimize the noise coming out of the casing, by controlling vibration of its walls. The shunt technology is applied. The proposed control algorithm is based on algorithms from a group of soft computing. It is verified by means of simulations using data acquired from a real object.
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Abstract

Vibrating plates can be used in Active Noise Control (ANC) applications as active barriers or as secondary sources replacing classical loudspeakers. The system with vibrating plates, especially when nonlinear MFC actuators are used, is nonlinear. The nonlinearity in the system reduces performance of classical feedforward ANC with linear control filters systems, because they cannot cope with harmonics generated by the nonlinearity. The performance of the ANC system can be improved by using nonlinear control filters, such as Artificial Neural Networks or Volterra filters. However, when multiple actuators are mounted on a single plate, which is a common practice to provide effective control of more vibration modes, each actuator should be driven by a dedicated nonlinear control filter. This significantly increases computational complexity of the control algorithm, because adaptation of nonlinear control filters is much more computationally demanding than adaptation of linear FIR filters. This paper presents an ANC system with multiple actuators, which are driven with a single nonlinear filter. To avoid destructive interference of vibrations generated by different actuators the control signal is filtered by appropriate separate linear filters. The control system is experimentally verified and obtained results are reported.
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Abstract

Vibrating plates have been recently used for a number of active noise control applications. They are resistant to difficult environmental conditions including dust, humidity, and even precipitation. However, their properties significantly depend on temperature. The plate temperature changes, caused by ambient temperature changes or plate heating due to internal friction, result in varying response of the plate, and may make it significantly different than response of a fixed model. Such mismatch may deteriorate performance of an active noise control system or even lead to divergence of a model-based adaptation algorithm. In this paper effects of vibrating plate temperature variation on a feedforward adaptive active noise reduction system with the multichannel Filtered-reference LMS algorithm are examined. For that purpose, a thin aluminum plate is excited with multiple Macro-Fiber Composite actuators. The plate temperature is forced by a set of Peltier cells, what allows for both cooling and heating the plate. The noise is generated at one side of the plate, and a major part of it is transmitted through the plate. The goal of the control system is to reduce sound pressure level at a specified area on the other side of the plate. To guarantee successful operation of the control system in face of plate temperature variation, a gain-scheduling scheme is proposed to support the Filtered-reference LMS algorithm.
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Abstract

The Least Mean Square (LMS) algorithm and its variants are currently the most frequently used adaptation algorithms; therefore, it is desirable to understand them thoroughly from both theoretical and practical points of view. One of the main aspects studied in the literature is the influence of the step size on stability or convergence of LMS-based algorithms. Different publications provide different stability upper bounds, but a lower bound is always set to zero. However, they are mostly based on statistical analysis. In this paper we show, by means of control theoretic analysis confirmed by simulations, that for the leaky LMS algorithm, a small negative step size is allowed. Moreover, the control theoretic approach alows to minimize the number of assumptions necessary to prove the new condition. Thus, although a positive step size is fully justified for practical applications since it reduces the mean-square error, knowledge about an allowed small negative step size is important from a cognitive point of view.
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Abstract

A novel 4-D chaotic hyperjerk system with four quadratic nonlinearities is presented in this work. It is interesting that the hyperjerk system has no equilibrium. A chaotic attractor is said to be a hidden attractor when its basin of attraction has no intersection with small neighborhoods of equilibrium points of the system. Thus, our new non-equilibrium hyperjerk system possesses a hidden attractor. Chaos in the system has been observed in phase portraits and verified by positive Lyapunov exponents. Adaptive backstepping controller is designed for the global chaos control of the non-equilibrium hyperjerk system with a hidden attractor. An electronic circuit for realizing the non-equilibrium hyperjerk system is also introduced, which validates the theoretical chaotic model of the hyperjerk system with a hidden chaotic attractor.
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Abstract

In this paper, the adaptive control based on symbolic solution of Diophantine equation is used to suppress circular plate vibrations. It is assumed that the system to be regulated is unknown. The plate is excited by a uniform force over the bottom surface generated by a loudspeaker. The axially-symmetrical vibrations of the plate are measured by the application of the strain sensors located along the plate radius, and two centrally placed piezoceramic discs are used to cancel the plate vibrations. The adaptive control scheme presented in this work has the ability to calculate the error sensor signals, to compute the control effort and to apply it to the actuator within one sampling period. For precise identification of system model the regularized RLS algorithm has been applied. Self-tuning controller of RST type, derived for the assumed system model of the 4th order is used to suppress the plate vibration. Some numerical examples illustrating the improvement gained by incorporating adaptive control are demonstrated.
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Abstract

Active Noise Control (ANC) of noise transmitted through a vibrating plate causes many problems not observed in classical ANC using loudspeakers. They are mainly due to vibrations of a not ideally clamped plate and use of nonlinear actuators, like MFC patches. In case of noise transmission though a plate, nonlinerities exist in both primary and secondary paths. Existence of nonlinerities in the system may degrade performance of a linear feedforward control system usually used for ANC. The performance degradation is especially visible for simple deterministic noise, such as tonal noise, where very high reduction is expected. Linear feedforward systems in such cases are unable to cope with higher harmonics generated by the nonlinearities. Moreover, nonlinearities, if not properly tackled with, may cause divergence of an adaptive control system. In this paper a feedforward ANC system reducing sound transmitted through a vibrating plate is presented. The ANC system uses nonlinear control filters to suppress negative effects of nonlinearies in the system. Filtered-error LMS algorithm, found more suitable than usually used Filtered-reference LMS algorithm, is employed for updating parameters of the nonlinear filters. The control system is experimentally verified and obtained results are discussed.
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Abstract

For many adaptive noise control systems the Filtered-Reference LMS, known as the FXLMS algorithm is used to update parameters of the control filter. Appropriate adjustment of the step size is then important to guarantee convergence of the algorithm, obtain small excess mean square error, and react with required rate to variation of plant properties or noise nonstationarity. There are several recipes presented in the literature, theoretically derived or of heuristic origin. This paper focuses on a modification of the FXLMS algorithm, were convergence is guaranteed by changing sign of the algorithm steps size, instead of using a model of the secondary path. A TakagiSugeno-Kang fuzzy inference system is proposed to evaluate both the sign and the magnitude of the step size. Simulation experiments are presented to validate the algorithm and compare it to the classical FXLMS algorithm in terms of convergence and noise reduction.
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Abstract

The paper presents a study of a possible application of structure embedded piezoelectric actuators to enhance the performance of a rotating composite beam exhibiting the coupled flexural-flexural vibrations. The discussed transversal and lateral bending modal coupling results from the directional properties of the beam's laminate and ply stacking distribution. The mathematical model of the beam is based on an assumption of cross-sectional non-deformability and it incorporates a number of non-classical effects. The final 1-D governing equations of an active composite beam include both orthotropic properties of the laminate and transversely isotropic properties of piezoelectric layers. The system's control capabilities resulting from embedded Macro Fiber Composite piezoelectric actuators are represented by the boundary bending moment. To enhance the dynamic properties of the composite specimen under consideration a combination of linear proportional control strategies has been used. Comparison studies have been performed, including the impact on modal coupling magnitude and cross-over frequency shift.
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Abstract

In the areas of acoustic research or applications that deal with not-precisely-known or variable conditions, a method of adaptation to the uncertainness or changes is usually necessary. When searching for an adaptation algorithm, it is hard to overlook the least mean squares (LMS) algorithm. Its simplicity, speed of computation, and robustness has won it a wide area of applications: from telecommunication, through acoustics and vibration, to seismology. The algorithm, however, still lacks a full theoretical analysis. This is probabely the cause of its main drawback: the need of a careful choice of the step size - which is the reason why so many variable step size flavors of the LMS algorithm has been developed. This paper contributes to both the above mentioned characteristics of the LMS algorithm. First, it shows a derivation of a new necessary condition for the LMS algorithm convergence. The condition, although weak, proved useful in developing a new variable step size LMS algorithm which appeared to be quite different from the algorithms known from the literature. Moreover, the algorithm proved to be effective in both simulations and laboratory experiments, covering two possible applications: adaptive line enhancement and active noise control.
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Abstract

The aim of this paper is to show that a real order generalization of the dissipative concepts is a useful tool to determine the stability (in the Lyapunov and in the input-output sense) and to design control strategies not only for fractional order non-linear systems, but also for systems composed of integer and fractional order subsystems (mixed-order systems). In particular, the fractional control of integer order system (e.g. PI╬╗ control) can be formalized. The key point is that the gradations of dissipativeness, passivity and positive realness concepts are related among them. Passivating systems is used as a strategy to stabilize them, which is studied in the non-adaptive as well as in the adaptive case.
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Abstract

The genesis of both coherent structures and reactive flow control strategies is explored. Futuristic control systems that utilize mi-crosensors and microactuators together with artificial intelligence to target specific coherent structures in a transitional or turbulent flow are considered. Of possible interest to the readers of this journal is the concept of smart wings, to be briefly discussed early in the article.
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Abstract

There are many industrial environments which are exposed to a high-level noise, sometimes much higher than the level of speech. Verbal communication is then practically unfeasible. In order to increase the speech intelligibility, appropriate speech enhancement algorithms can be used. It is impossible to filter off the noise completely from the acquired signal by using a conventional filter, because of two reasons. First, the speech and the noise frequency contents are overlapping. Second, the noise properties are subject to change. The adaptive realisation of the Wiener-based approach can be, however, applied. Two structures are possible. One is the line enhancer, where the predictive realisation of the Wiener approach is used. The benefit of using this structure it that it does not require additional apparatus. The second structure takes advantage of the high level of noise. Under such condition, placing another microphone, even close to the primary one, can provide a reference signal well correlated with the noise disturbing the speech and lacking the information about the speech. Then, the classical Wiener filter can be used, to produce an estimate of the noise based on the reference signal. That noise estimate can be then subtracted from the disturbed speech. Both algorithms are verified, based on the data obtained from the real industrial environment. For laboratory experiments the G. R. A. S. artificial head and two microphones, one at back side of an earplug and another at the mouth are used.
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