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Abstract

The paper presents an investigation of mass transfer in gas-liquid annular flow in a microreactor. The microreactor had a meandered shape with a square cross-section of the channel (292×292 μm, hydraulic diameter 292 μm) and 250 mm in length. The rate of CO2 absorption from the CO2/N2 mixture in NaOH (0.1 M, 0.2 M, 0.7 M, 1.0 M and 1.5 M) water solutions was measured. Two velocities of gas flow and two velocities of liquid flow were used. In two cases a fully developed annular flow at the beginning of the channel was observed, whilst in two cases annular flow was formed only in about 2/3 of the microchannel length. Based on the measurements of CO2 absorption rate, the values of volumetric liquid - side mass transfer coefficients with the chemical reaction were determined. Then physical values of coefficients were found. Obtained results were discussed and their values were compared with the values predicted by literature correlations.
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Abstract

In this paper a three-dimensional model for determination of a microreactor's length is presented and discussed. The reaction of thermocatalytic decomposition has been implemented on the base of experimental data. Simplified Reynolds-Maxwell formula for the slip velocity boundary condition has been analysed and validated. The influence of the Knudsen diffusion on the microreactor's performance has also been verified. It was revealed that with a given operating conditions and a given geometry of the microreactor, there is no need for application of slip boundary conditions and the Knudsen diffusion in further analysis. It has also been shown that the microreactor's length could be practically estimated using standard models.
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Abstract

The pressure drop in microreactors for the gas - liquid Taylor flow was measured for 4 different microreactor geometries and 3 different gas - liquid systems. The results have been compared with the existing literature correlations. A selection of the best correlations has been made.
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Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine the solubility of CO2 in perfluorodecalin (PFD) which is frequently used as efficient liquid carrier of respiratory gases in bioprocess engineering. The application of perfluorinated liquid in a microsystem has been presented. Gas-liquid mass transfer during Taylor (slug) flow in a microchannel of circular cross section 0.4 mm in diameter has been investigated. A physicochemical system of the absorption of CO2 from the CO2/N2 mixture in perfluorodecalin has been applied. The Henry’s law constants have been found according to two theoretical approaches: physical (H = 1.22·10-3 mol/m3Pa) or chemical (H = 1.26·10-3 mol/m3Pa) absorption. We are hypothesising that the gas-liquid microchannel system is applicable to determine the solubility of respiratory gases in perfluorinated liquids.
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Abstract

Gas-liquid microreactors find an increasing range of applications both in production, and for chemical analysis. The most often employed flow regime in these microreactors is Taylor flow. The rate of absorption of gases in liquids depends on gas-side and liquid-side resistances. There are several publications about liquid-side mass transfer coefficients in Taylor flow, but the data about gas-side mass transfer coefficients are practically non existent. We analysed the problem of gas-side mass transfer resistance in Taylor flow and determined conditions, in which it may influence the overall mass transfer rate. Investigations were performed using numerical simulations. The influence of the gas diffusivity, gas viscosity, channel diameter, bubble length and gas bubble velocity has been determined. It was found that in some case the mass transfer resistances in both phases are comparable and the gas-side resistance may be significant. In such cases, neglecting the gas-side coefficient may lead to errors in the experimental data interpretation.
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