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Number of results: 10
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Keywords parasites

Abstract

What can parasites do? According to Kathleen McAuliffe’s book This is Your Brain on Parasites, they can affect human thinking and behavior, and thus change us into obedient machines.
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Abstract

The highest infestation by phoronts (resting stages) of Apostoma ciliates forms 1, 2, is restricted to the 3-th and 4-th pairs of E. superba thoracic limbs. They occur mostly on meropodites of endopodite and plumose setae of exopodite. The trophonts (trophic stage) of those Apostoma are present in large numbers in krill's tissue. The life cycle of those histophagous Apostoma include also free-living stage - tomit. Swarm formed by krill seems to be a reason for the common and extensive infestation by protozoans.
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Abstract

Parasitic isopods (Aega antarclica and Gnathia calva) were discovered on fishes collected during Polish expeditions to the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. Pranizae of G.calva infected 14.5% of Nololhenia corriceps neglecta and 16% of Notothenia rossi marmorata. The infestation rates are probably underestimated.
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Abstract

Over half of all organisms living on Earth today are parasites, and there are hardly any species which are free from them. How can the “wild immunology” approach help us understand them better?
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Abstract

A new species, Chenophila nanseni sp. n., collected from covert quills of the barnacle goose Branta leucopsis (Anseriformes: Anatidae) in Svalbard (Spitsbergen) is described and female polymorphism is recorded in this species. In syringophilids this phenomenon was known only for representatives of the genus Stibarokris. The new species differs from the similar Ch. platyrhynchos by following features: in females of Ch. nanseni the anterior margin of the propodonotal shield is flat (vs. concave in Ch. platyrhynchos) and the lengths of idiosomal setae si, f2 and ag3 in Ch. nanseni are distinctly shorter than in Ch. plathyrynchos.
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Abstract

In total, 8511 amphipods of 12 species caught in Admiralty Bay were examined for the presence of acanthocephalans using them as intermediate hosts. Only 27 specimens of eight species were infected (total prevalence 0.32%). Acanthellae and cystacanths of four species using fishes as either definitive or paratenic hosts were found. Normally, single parasites occurred; in one case two acanthocephalans were present in one specimen of Bovallia gigantea. This host species was the most strongly infected, with the prevalence 3.41%. Six other amphipod species were infected with the prevalence 0.08-0.66%. One of two Jassa ingens examined was also infected. Over 50% of acanthocephalans belonged to one echinorhynchid species maturing in fishes, Aspersentis megarhynchus, which occurred in five host species of four amphipod families, B. gigantea, Gondogeneia antarctica, J. ingens, Hippomedon kergueleni and Orchomenella rotundi-frons. Two polymorphid species maturing in seals, Corynosoma hamanni and C. pseudohamanni, were found in a single host species each, Prostebbingia brevicornis and Cheirimedon femoratus, respectively. Three parasite species mentioned occurred exclusively in sublittoral host species, at the depth 0-30 m. The third polymorphid species, C. bullosum, was the only species occurring in the amphipod, Waldeckia obesa, living in the deeper water (infected specimen was caught at the depth 60 m), but was found also in B. gigantea. Differences between infections of Amphipoda and fishes with echinorhynchids and polymorphids are discussed.
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Abstract

The two bathydraconid species, Gymnodraco acuticeps and Cygnodraco mawsoni, caught in the Ross Sea (Antarctic summer 2002) were examined for internal parasites. All specimens (four G. acuticeps and one C. mawsoni) were infected. G. acuticeps harboured larval Cestoda (bilocular tetraphyllidean cercoids, diphyllobothriid plerocercoids) and Nematoda (Contracaecum spp.), acanthocephalan cystacanths and adult helminths (three species of Digenea and one species of Nematoda). Two specimens of C. mawsoni (including data from one additional specimen examined earlier) were infected by larval Cestoda (bilocular cercoid) and Nematoda (Contracaecum spp.) and adult helminths (three species of Digenea and one species of Nematoda). The present data are compared and discussed with the relevant literature data.
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Abstract

Trematomus newnesi (Nototheniidae), a bentho-pelagic fish, caught off Adélie Land (eastern Antarctic) was examined for the presence of internal parasitic worms. These fishes were infected with 11 species and larval forms of parasites: Digenea (Macvicaria pennelli, Neolebouria terranovaensis, Genolinea bowersi, and Elytrophalloides oatesi), larval Cestoda (two forms of tetraphyllidean metacestodes, bilocular form and trilocular form, and diphyllobothriid plerocercoids), Acanthocephala (Metacanthocephalus campbelli, M. johnstoni) and larval Nematoda (Contracaecum osculatum, C. radiatum). Larval cestodes were the dominant parasites, whereas acanthocephalans were relatively rare. Five species and larval forms were recorded also in fish caught in the Davis Sea. A check list of parasites of T. newnesi recorded in the eastern- and western Antarctic comprises 21 species and larval forms. Probably, T. newnesi plays an important role in life cycles of parasitic worms in the Antarctic.
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Abstract

In total, 18 species and larval forms of endoparasitic worms were found in 19 newly examined notothenioid fishes of three species, Trematomus hansom, Notothenia coriiceps and Chionodraco hamatus, caught off Adelie Land. One digenean species, Neolepidapedon trema-tomi, was recorded in this area for the first time. A total list of endoparasitic worms prepared by Zdzitowiecki etal. (1998) increased from 20 to 21 species and larval forms and concerns 11 deter­mined and one determined species of Digenea (the most diverse group), three larval forms of Cestoda, three species (one identified only to genus) of Acanthocephala, two species (one in the larval stage) and one larval form of Nematoda. All these species and forms, with the exception of the indetcrmined digenean, occur also in the deep Antarctica, in the Ross Sea and/or in the Weddell Sea. The prevalence and relative density of infection with each parasite in three host species is given based on summarized previous and new data.
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Abstract

The infections of four fish species, Trematomus newnesi, T. bernacchii, Lindbergichthys nudifrons and Harpagifer antarcticus with parasitic worms, in the coastal zone off the Vernadsky Station (Argentine Islands, West Antarctica) are described. Data on infections are compared with previous results from Admiralty Bay at the South Shetland Islands. Indices of infection are for each host-parasite relationship. In total, 16 taxa of parasites were recorded: 6 digeneans, 3 larval cestodes, 4 (adult and cystacanth) acanthocephalans, and 3 (adult and larval) nematodes. Fifteen of them have been previously recorded in Notothenia coriiceps from this area. Hence, the number of parasitic taxa recorded in this region increased from 21 to 22. Either the digenean Macvicaria georgiana or acanthocephalan Corynosoma pseudohamanni were dominants in different hosts. Trematomus bernacchii was the most strongly infected, especially with M. georgiana (prevalence 100%, mean abundance 113.7). The infection parameters of the majority of parasites were lower at the Vernadsky Station than in the Admiralty Bay, especially for host-parasite relations with larval cestodes and nematodes. The presently reported study have confirmed that the southern range of distribution of two acanthocephalans, Aspersentis megarhynchus and Corynosoma hamanni extends south to the area near the Argentine Islands.
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