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Abstract

A limited ability to discriminate between different materials is the fundamental problem with all conventional eddy-current-based metal detectors. This paper presents the use, evaluation and classification of nontraditional excitation signals for eddy-current metal detectors to improve their detection and discrimination ability. The presented multi-frequency excitation signals are as follows: a step sweep sine wave, a linear frequency sweep and sin(x)/x signals. All signals are evaluated in the frequency domain. Amplitude and phase spectra and polar graphs of the detector output signal are used for classification and discrimination of the tested objects. Four different classifiers are presented. The classification results obtained with the use of poly-harmonic signals are compared with those obtained with a classical single-tone method. Multifrequency signals provide more detailed information, due to the response function – the frequency characteristic of a detected object, than standard single-tone methods. Based on the measurements and analysis, a metal object can be better distinguished than when using a single-tone method.
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Abstract

Based on recent advances in non-linear analysis, the surface electromyography (sEMG) signal has been studied from the viewpoints of self-affinity and complexity. In this study, we examine usage of critical exponent analysis (CE) method, a fractal dimension (FD) estimator, to study properties of the sEMG signal and to deploy these properties to characterize different movements for gesture recognition. SEMG signals were recorded from thirty subjects with seven hand movements and eight muscle channels. Mean values and coefficient of variations of the CE from all experiments show that there are larger variations between hand movement types but there is small variation within the same type. It also shows that the CE feature related to the self-affine property for the sEMG signal extracted from different activities is in the range of 1.855~2.754. These results have also been evaluated by analysis-of-variance (p-value). Results show that the CE feature is more suitable to use as a learning parameter for a classifier compared with other representative features including root mean square, median frequency and Higuchi's method. Most p-values of the CE feature were less than 0.0001. Thus the FD that is computed by the CE method can be applied to be used as a feature for a wide variety of sEMG applications.
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Abstract

EEG signal-based sleep stage classification facilitates an initial diagnosis of sleep disorders. The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of three methods for feature extraction: power spectral density (PSD), discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and empirical mode decomposition (EMD) in the automatic classification of sleep stages by an artificial neural network (ANN). 13650 30-second EEG epochs from the PhysioNet database, representing five sleep stages (W, N1-N3 and REM), were transformed into feature vectors using the aforementioned methods and principal component analysis (PCA). Three feed-forward ANNs with the same optimal structure (12 input neurons, 23 + 22 neurons in two hidden layers and 5 output neurons) were trained using three sets of features, obtained with one of the compared methods each. Calculating PSD from EEG epochs in frequency sub-bands corresponding to the brain waves (81.1% accuracy for the testing set, comparing with 74.2% for DWT and 57.6% for EMD) appeared to be the most effective feature extraction method in the analysed problem.
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Abstract

Purpose: to demonstrate the possibility of finding features reliable for more precise distinguishing between normal and abnormal Pattern Electroretinogram (PERG) recordings, in Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) coefficients domain. To determine characteristic features of the PERG and Pattern Visual Evoked Potential (PVEP) waveforms important in the task of precise classification and assessment of these recordings. Material and methods: 60 normal PERG waveforms and 60 PVEPs as well as 47 PERGs and 27 PVEPs obtained in some retinal and optic nerve diseases were studied in the two age groups (<= 50 years, > 50 years). All these signals were recorded in accordance with the guidelines of ISCEV in the Laboratory of Electrophysiology of the Retina and Visual Pathway and Static Perimetry, at the Department and Clinic of Ophthalmology of the Pomeranian Medical University. Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) was used for the time-frequency analysis and modelling of the PERG signal. Discriminant analysis and logistic regression were performed in statistical analysis of the PERG and PVEP signals. Obtained mathematical models were optimized using Fisher F(n1; n2) test. For preliminary evaluation of the obtained classification methods and algorithms in clinical practice, 22 PERGs and 55 PVEPs were chosen with respect to especially difficult discrimination problems (“borderline” recordings). Results: comparison between the method using CWT and standard time-domain based analysis showed that determining the maxima and minima of the PERG waves was achieved with better accuracy. This improvement was especially evident in waveforms with unclear peaks as well as in noisy signals. Predictive, quantitative models for PERGs and PVEPs binary classification were obtained based on characteristic features of the waveform morphology. Simple calculations algorithms for clinical applications were elaborated. They proved effective in distinguishing between normal and abnormal recordings. Conclusions: CWT based method is efficient in more precise assessment of the latencies of the PERG waveforms, improving separation between normal and abnormal waveforms. Filtering of the PERG signal may be optimized based on the results of the CWT analysis. Classification of the PERG and PVEP waveforms based on statistical methods is useful in preliminary interpretation of the recordings as well as in supporting more accurate assessment of clinical data.
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