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Abstract

This paper presents a complex study of anhydrite interbeds influence on the cavern stability in the Mechelinki salt deposit. The impact of interbeds on the cavern shape and the stress concentrations were also considered. The stability analysis was based on the 3D numerical modelling. Numerical simulations were performed with use of the Finite Difference Method (FDM) and the FLAC3D v. 6.00 software. The numerical model in a cuboidal shape and the following dimensions: length 1400, width 1400, height 1400 m, comprised the part of the Mechelinki salt deposit. Three (K-6, K-8, K-9) caverns were projected inside this model. The mesh of the numerical model contained about 15 million tetrahedral elements. The occurrence of anhydrite interbeds within the rock salt beds had contributed to the reduction in a diameter and irregular shape of the analysed caverns. The results of the 3D numerical modelling had indicated that the contact area between the rock salt beds and the anhydrite interbeds is likely to the occurrence of displacements. Irregularities in a shape of the analysed caverns are prone to the stress concentration. However, the stability of the analysed caverns are not expected to be affected in the assumed operation conditions and time period (9.5 years).
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Abstract

The study deals with stability and dynamic problems in bar structures using a probabilistic approach. Structural design parameters are defined as deterministic values and also as random variables, which are not correlated. The criterion of structural failure is expressed by the condition of non-exceeding the admissible load multiplier and condition of non-exceeding the admissible vertical displacement. The Hasofer-Lind index was used as a reliability measure. The primary research tool is the FORM method. In order to verify the correctness of the calculations Monte Carlo and Importance Sampling methods were used. The sensitivity of the reliability index to the random variables was defined. The limit state function is not an explicit function of random variables. This dependence was determined using a numerical procedure, e.g. the finite element methods. The paper aims to present the communication between the STAND reliability analysis program and the KRATA and MES3D external FE programs.
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Abstract

In this article, an engineering/physical dynamic system including losses is analyzed inrelation to the stability from an engineer’s/physicist’s point of view. Firstly, conditions for a Hamiltonian to be an energy function, time independent or not, is explained herein. To analyze stability of engineering system, Lyapunov-like energy function, called residual energy function is used. The residual function may contain, apart from external energies, negative losses as well. This function includes the sum of potential and kinetic energies, which are special forms and ready-made (weak) Lyapunov functions, and loss of energies (positive and/or negative) of a system described in different forms using tensorial variables. As the Lypunov function, residual energy function is defined as Hamiltonian energy function plus loss of energies and then associated weak and strong stability are proved through the first time-derivative of residual energy function. It is demonstrated how the stability analysis can be performed using the residual energy functions in different formulations and in generalized motion space when available. This novel approach is applied to RLC circuit, AC equivalent circuit of Gunn diode oscillator for autonomous, and a coupled (electromechanical) example for nonautonomous case. In the nonautonomous case, the stability criteria can not be proven for one type of formulation, however, it can be proven in the other type formulation.
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Abstract

Electro-dynamic passive magnetic bearings are now viewed as a feasible option when looking for support for high-speed rotors. Nevertheless, because of the skew-symmetrical visco-elastic properties of such bearings, they are prone to operational instability. In order to avoid this, the paper proposes the addition of external damping into the newly designed vibrating laboratory rotor-shaft system. This may be achieved by means of using simple passive dampers that would be found among the components of the electro-dynamic bearing housings along with magnetic dampers, which satisfy the operational principles of active magnetic bearings. Theoretical investigations are going to be conducted by means of a structural computer model of the rotor-shaft under construction, which will take into consideration its actual dimensions and material properties. The additional damping magnitudes required to stabilize the most sensitive lateral eigenmodes of the object under consideration have been determined by means of the Routh-Hurwitz stability criterion.
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Abstract

The main idea of this work is to demonstrate an application of the generalized perturbation-based Stochastic Finite Element Method for a determination of the reliability indicators concerning elastic stability for a certain spectrum of the civil engineering structures. The reliability indicator is provided after the Eurocode according to the First Order Reliability Method, and computed using the higher order Taylor expansions with random coefficients. Computational implementation provided by the hybrid usage of the FEM system ROBOT and the computer algebra system MAPLE enables for reliability analysis of the critical forces in the most popular civil engineering structures like simple Euler beam, 2 and 3D single and multi-span steel frames, as well as polyethylene underground cylindrical shell. A contrast of the perturbation-based numerical approach with the Monte-Carlo simulation technique for the entire variability of the input random dispersion included into the Euler problem demonstrates the probabilistic efficiency of the perturbation method proposed.
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