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Abstract

Image segmentation is a typical operation in many image analysis and computer vision applications. However, hyperspectral image segmentation is a field which have not been fully investigated. In this study an analogue- digital image segmentation technique is presented. The system uses an acousto-optic tuneable filter, and a CCD camera to capture hyperspectral images that are stored in a digital grey scale format. The data set was built considering several objects with remarkable differences in the reflectance and brightness components. In addition, the work presents a semi-supervised segmentation technique to deal with the complex problem of hyperspectral image segmentation, with its corresponding quantitative and qualitative evaluation. Particularly, the developed acousto-optic system is capable to acquire 120 frames through the whole visible light spectrum. Moreover, the analysis of the spectral images of a given object enables its segmentation using a simple subtraction operation. Experimental results showed that it is possible to segment any region of interest with a good performance rate by using the proposed analogue-digital segmentation technique.
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Abstract

This study discusses the cross-cultural re-conceptualization of the slogan ‘I’m lovin’ it’, popularized in Poland by a global fast-food restaurant chain, which occurs in the inter-linguistic transfer between English and Polish. The analytical framework for the study is provided by Cultural Linguistics and the Re-conceptualization and Approximation Theory. The analysis is based on proposals submitted by 45 translators asked to come up with a Polish equivalent of the slogan. The results indicate that because the semantic networks for the meaning of love do not overlap between English and Polish perfectly, attempts at the cross-cultural transfer of the slogan can be approached only as more or less accurate approximations of the original meaning constructed according to culture-specific norms, expectations, and attitudes.
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